Harmonic Connections: The Patch Works and WERD Radio Station

On August 20th, please join us at The Patch Works for the first evening of a unique and collaborative two-part event: Todd Mack and Music in Common are bringing together two organizations — The Patch Works and WERD Radio — to discuss not just their respective histories, but also the music and other elements that bind and unite our seemingly disparate communities.

WERD Radio is the first, African-American-owned radio station in the country, where Dr. Martin Luther King himself would broadcast sermons and civil rights’ commentary. After years of obscurity, WERD has been resurrected by Ricci de Forest, who will be our guest on August 20th and then our gracious host on August 22nd.

Also participating on August 20th will be our amazing friends Slim Chance (aka James Kelly) and Dr. Erich Nunn. Slim will perform examples of Hillbilly music, while Dr. Nunn will discuss the origins of such music in Cabbagetown and how it evolved from sounds being produced by African-American performers at that time.

For more information, please view our calendar entry. Or visit the Facebook Event.

Pecha Kucha ATL Presentation

Click on the above image to hear an online version of our lecture…

On December 9, Pecha Kucha Atlanta held a really cool event called “Atlanta: Past, Present and Future.” Along with several other presenters, The Patch Works was selected to give one of Pecha Kucha’s signature “20 x 20” lectures: each speaker shows 20 slides and gets 20 seconds per slide to address the topic. We called our topic Cabbagetown: Changing Atlanta by Preserving History.

There was a big turnout at Brother Moto, which kindly hosted the event. (Thank you, Brother Moto!)

The Patch Works Humanities Lecture Series: Lessons of Cabbagetown, Past and Present

On Sunday, November 18th, join us as Rebecca Page, Ashley Cheyemi McNeil, and Brennan Collins from GSU’s Student Innovation Fellowship program speak about their mapping collaboration with The Patch Works on ATLmaps.org. They have brought together historical maps of Cabbagetown and stacked them with present-day interviews of long-time residents to uncover the original water sources that sustained the livelihood of the community.

There is no cost to attend.

TITLE:
Re-Surfacing Cabbagetown: Mapping the Emergence of Waterways and Stories

PRESENTERS:
Rebecca Page, Ashley Cheyemi McNeil, and Brennan Collins

INTERVIEWEES:
Ronnie Edwards, Marshall Edwards, Sarah Knight, Margaret Long, and Leon Little.

WHEN:
Sunday, November 18th, 2018; 3:30PM-5:30PM

WHERE:
The Patch Works Art & History Center
593 Gaskill Street SE
Atlanta, GA 30316


For more information on Georgia Humanities-sponsored programs, please visit their events calendar.

This project is supported by Georgia Humanities, in partnership with the Georgia Department of Economic Development, through funding from the Georgia General Assembly.

Georgia Humanities Lecture Series

We just had our second lecture sponsored by Georgia Humanities. Dr. Erich Nunn (Auburn University) and Dr. Regina Bradley (Kennesaw State University) spoke about how Cabbagetown’s musical roots relate to the evolving tastes and trends of modern day Atlanta. 

Georgia Humanities Lecture Series

We just had our first of three lectures sponsored by Georgia Humanities. Common Good Atlanta hostees, Bill Taft and Dr. Sarah Higinbotham, accompanied by program alumni Tariq Baiyina and Robert Roebuck, discussed the ways that higher education prepares incarcerated men and women to return to their hometowns and neighborhoods. Speaking to a packed house, Bill Taft and Dr. Sarah Higinbotham, accompanied by program alumni Tariq Baiyina and Robert Roebuck, discussed the ways that higher education prepares incarcerated men and women to return to their hometowns and neighborhoods.